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Snelbaard's eternal project car  

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haloruler64
(@haloruler64)
Honorable Member

Not notorious, I just worry because those bolts are kinda soft and the hardtop is fiberglass. As far as I know there are metal inserts but still, scary! 

2000 Toyota MR2 Spyder, 2017 Lexus CT200h F Sport

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Posted : July 17, 2020 4:24 pm
Snelbaard
(@snelbaard)
Eminent Member

Oh yeah the bolts are extremely soft, you really have to take care to take them out gently. But you're right, they sit in metal inserts so that part isn't so scary. Don't really know what Toyota were thinking with these bolts..

Also: new goodies!

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Posted : July 18, 2020 5:56 am
Snelbaard
(@snelbaard)
Eminent Member

This week I went to change my lower steering shaft u-joint. As you can see it was pretty knackered, which is common in these parts. They are completely exposed to the elements so I figured I'd make a kit to protect it. Installed that, looks a lot better and it gives peace of mind to know the joint will stay good for a long while.

 

 

 

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Posted : July 31, 2020 7:25 am
Uncle Mush
(@uncle-mush)
Member Moderator

Very nice.  Thanks for the write-up.  Was the rubber boot OEM or did you substitute with something else?  If something else, what was it from that you were able to adapt for this repair?  Costs?  Time to make repair?  Any challenges or was it easy-peasey?  Thanks again for the write-up.  Much appreciated.

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Posted : July 31, 2020 8:11 pm
Snelbaard
(@snelbaard)
Eminent Member

Thanks! The rubber boot is actually a steering rack component off of a PSA car, which just happens to have the right dimensions. The other parts (the end caps) I designed and CNC turned myself. I've made a whole bunch of kits which are available for 29,95 euros plus shipping. 

When I went to install the kit I found it a bit of a finicky job, but that was almost entirely due to the old u-joint being rusted on to its spline shaft so thoroughly. You have to swing a hammer at it but there's barely any room for that. But lots of penetrating oil and some patience did the trick in the end. The installation of the dust boot kit itself was easy peasy. Make sure you don't change the alignment of the steering wheel in relation to the wheels during this job. I just put the steering wheel on the steering lock, which took care of that. All in all it should take about an hour.

I would refer you to this excellent instructional video for a walk through of how to remove the u-joint:

Then the installation of the kit broken down into steps:

  • After you've removed your U-joint (and concluded it is deserving of protection, rather than replacement), thoroughly pack the joint with grease.
  • Slide the dust boot over the joint.
  • Slide the upper end cap over the shaft. (It fits very snugly to make it water tight, so some percussive persuasion might be called for)
  • Slide the edge of the dust boot over the ridge of the end cap and secure it in place with one of the ty-wraps.
  • Put the O-ring over the little slot on the input shaft on the steering rack (for the purpose of these pictures, I turned a stainless thingey that has the same slot)
  • Slide the lower end cap over the O-ring.
  • Put the U-joint back in the car.
  • Slide the lower edge of the dust boot over the ridge on the lower end cap and secure it with the second ty-wrap

 

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Posted : August 1, 2020 7:44 am
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