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The random chat thread for throwing out things that don't matter

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CSPIDY
(@cspidy)
Reputable Member
Posted by: @dev
Posted by: @cspidy
Posted by: @dev

@cspidy 

Hand grinding has some advantages. Because you are grinding slower you will produce less heat which is good but it can be a real pain depending on how many grams you need to pull a shot. My hand grinder is large with big burrs and a large flywheel so its quick but it also costs a small fortune. When I started out with a small hand grinder it took nearly forever to get 14g. 
I did hear good things about these guys but I never used one of their grinders.

https://www.oehandgrinders.com/OE-LIDO-ET-Manual-Coffee-Grinder-_p_94.html

Here is another entry level grinder that has got good reviews. 

https://www.amazon.com/Baratza-Sette-30-Conical-Grinder/dp/B075G11F9N/ref=sr_1_12?crid=W9NH64INA58X&keywords=niche+zero+grinder&qid=1649821892&sprefix=niche+zero+grinder%2Caps%2C34&sr=8-12

 

I would be using it for espresso, one tablespoon at a time

Actually a better question would be what kind of espresso machine are you using and how many grams of coffee is needed.  

It’s a Mr Coffee, my wife bought 2 of them at a Kmart that was going out of business 

gave one to my son and meant to give the other to me

after 5 years she found it and gave it to me

I know it’s cheap, but so am I

I drive a Spyder remember 

and

if it was good enough for Joe it’s good enough for me 

I use about a table spoon to make a double espresso 

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Posted : April 13, 2022 8:26 pm
dev
 dev
(@dev)
Just a member. Moderator

No shame in that. That is how I started with something similar that made espresso using less coffee. It was given to me by a Spyder friend I met that was going to throw it out when I was fascinated by his coffee set up but thought it was insane for him to spend $400 on a grinder.  I first tried ground coffee and it was a disaster and then a blade grinder that also did not turn out well.  Eventually I bought a cheap hand grinder and it did the trick and made good espresso before I worked my way up and adapted it as a hobby. I eventually helped out my friend with modifications to his coffee machine and then we started roasting together by splitting the cost of a coffee roaster and greens.   

 

 I would get what marsrock7 suggested as this seems this will give you the best grind for your needs.  

https://store.handground.com/collections/frontpage/products/handground-precision-coffee-grinder

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Posted : April 14, 2022 10:35 am
CSPIDY
(@cspidy)
Reputable Member
Posted by: @dev

 

 I would get what marsrock7 suggested as this seems this will give you the best grind for your needs.  

https://store.handground.com/collections/frontpage/products/handground-precision-coffee-grinder

Thanks

I will look into that one

do you need to use a special bean for espresso or will most work well?

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Posted : April 15, 2022 8:17 am
dev
 dev
(@dev)
Just a member. Moderator
Posted by: @cspidy
Posted by: @dev

 

 I would get what marsrock7 suggested as this seems this will give you the best grind for your needs.  

https://store.handground.com/collections/frontpage/products/handground-precision-coffee-grinder

Thanks

I will look into that one

do you need to use a special bean for espresso or will most work well?

 That is a very hard question to say yes to.  

 Although you can use any bean as I have done, I would still choose an espresso roast to get a good result. 

 Espresso roasts are traditionally Italian which are dark oily beans usually of a mixture of several beans varieties of different proportions. They tend to hold up well to the espresso method without much channeling.  There is a lot more to it as the Americans prefer medium roasts for a different flavor profile. 

  It also depends on your machines set brew temps.  Darker roasts need lower brew temps and medium needs higher brew temps but generally these little espresso machines are set for darker roasts. 

 The way you know is from the taste of the espresso. If it taste burnt its too hot and if its taste sour its too cold. Because you don't have temp control each coffee will give you a different result compared to a different machine.  You might find one coffee to work the best but most will work until you find something that is optimum.

 I would also advise using a good method for bean storage. I have two airscape canisters which allow me to remove air from the beans which prolongs their life. 

 You might want to look into something like this as it can make a big difference in prolonging the taste between batches of coffee. I have been going 10 years strong with my airscape  so it could be one of those things you buy once for a lifetime of use. 

Airscape

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Posted : April 15, 2022 10:32 am
dev
 dev
(@dev)
Just a member. Moderator

Let me show you all what I am dealing with that has been the absolute joy of my life.  I like the understanding and mastery of my hobbies but sometimes it gets old but not coffee. It is one of those hobbies that on the surface seems ridiculous but it is an obsession for some because its elusive once you pull your first god shot. Its not about heating up water and passing it though. There is so much engineering involved with heat absorption and retention by the metals used and the transfer of heat.

 A few years ago I picked up a 1981 Cremina for $900 used that I rebuilt which was fun.  15 years ago people were throwing them out or selling them cheap because they  were very old but over the years they started to gain  a cult following because they are built so well.  At the time when I purchased I thought I was paying a premium and the price topped out but as of last year they have doubled in price close to $2k.  New ones go for $4k and it is considered the 911 of espresso machines.

  This guy describes it well but he doesn't know how to pull a shot. It takes years of mastery by repetition and then trying something slightly different and making a new discovery. I never did hard drugs but from what I heard if its done right its like crack.  

 

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Posted : April 15, 2022 4:35 pm
grumpy and CSPIDY liked
grumpy
(@grumpy)
Reputable Member

And with espresso, remember cleanliness is next to godliness.

Blown, it is like lift, only bigger, better, longer, stronger, harder... and that’s just the car. The first Rotrex supercharged 2zz Spyder.

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Posted : April 16, 2022 8:33 pm
CSPIDY and dev liked
haloruler64
(@haloruler64)
Prominent Member
Posted by: @uncle-mush

Looking for feedback regarding ethics of selling unobtanium.  I have been hoarding Spyder parts for years.  My habit has slowed considerably over the last few years.  Most of my buying has been fueled by fear of not being able to find parts if/when I need them.  I am now in a quandary, though.  I have acquired some spyder parts that are often sought after and rarely found -- New In Box, kind of thing.  I am not a salesman kind of person, but I know that these parts, in the current marketplace --  are worth 3 or 4 times what I paid for them.  If I hang onto them, they will likely keep going up in value.  I know that I will likely never need these parts for myself as I have sufficient parts for my own needs. 

Is it ethically correct for me to sell these parts -- at current market value -- knowing I would make an outrageous profit, if I were to sell them?  Yes, I could sell them for less money or for what I paid for them, but my mindset is also, well, if I were to sell them for what I paid for them, I would likely just keep them for myself (hoarding again).   Thank you in advance for your input. 

Be forewarned that I have no idea what I will end-up doing -- heed your advise or ignore your advice.  I'm just trying to be as transparent about this whole thing as I know how to be and trying to figure out what I will do.  Thanks again, in advance for your input.  Much appreciated.  

Perfectly ethical. There is demand, and you're charging what is normal price. Now, if it was something life saving or critical, no. If it's car parts, absolutely ethical. 

2000 Toyota MR2 Spyder, 2020 Mazda 3 Hatchback 6MT

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Topic starter Posted : April 17, 2022 1:51 am
Nelix
(@nelix)
Estimable Member

Of course it is ethical, fill your boots.

Cranky, cantankerous, sarcastic Scottish git whose interests are beer, cars, motorbikes and scuba diving.
Currently driving a 2018 sapphire blue Porsche 718 Boxster and riding a 2020 BMW S1000R Sport..

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Posted : April 17, 2022 5:12 am
Uncle Mush
(@uncle-mush)
Member Moderator

Thanks Haloruler 64 and Nelix.  Unobtanium for sale in the private sales thread. 🙂

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Posted : April 17, 2022 12:58 pm
dev
 dev
(@dev)
Just a member. Moderator

This has to be their weirdest most tragic testimony I have ever seen. Try not to laugh.

 

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Posted : April 24, 2022 9:59 am
RIA
 RIA
(@ria)
Estimable Member

I just retorqued my strut top nuts, and checked the mount studs, and my car now feels brand new lmao.

Was having some clunks when pressings the brakes at all, at any speed, and decided to check the suspension before doing a tear down of my recent brake installation. Front top nuts were suppppper loose. Tbh, not even sure if they were making contact with the top mount. Rears were maybe 10-15 ft lbs below spec. 

I installed these new struts probably 20k or so miles ago. When i installed them, I remembered not being able to get them all the way to spec, off or on the car, even using an impact. Kind of interesting that i was able to torque them to spec 20k miles later, on the car. Not sure whats up there but im not asking too many questions lol.

Car now feels super smooth over bumps, no more clunking when tapping the brakes, and no more clunk when starting to turn the wheel at a stop. This developed 1 or 2 days ago which made me suspicious in the first place.

Anyways, this is your sign to retorque your struts.

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Posted : April 26, 2022 8:32 pm
marsrock7
(@marsrock7)
Honorable Member

Retorque strut nuts.... I need to do this too.

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Posted : April 27, 2022 1:14 pm
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