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Weird sound and brake pedal behavior  

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NottaMiata
(@nottamiata)
Honorable Member

Hey all, hope you are plagueless.

I've noticed an odd behavior lately. There is a turn near my work that goes downhill a bit. I take this turn to the right, often at a decent clip so that I do not get rear-ended by the idiot behind me who invariably is not paying attention. Yes, I use my turn signal, but it has no effect on The Stupid...

So it is a hard turn (not for The Frog, for us it is a "fun" turn) that also goes downhill. I take it going at about 25 mph. Its a standard road entrance, tight, but easy for us.

Midway thru the turn, there is a weird grinding metallic sound from (I think) the front left wheel, which is to the outside of the turn. I can also feel it in the brake pedal, which is what concerns me enough to post. I do apply brakes thru the turn; we aren't suicidal.  But its not hard braking, because again, there's always some a**hole-with-dumbphone riding right on my tail.

I suspect it is a garden-variety fender rub. I am on 16" wheels in front, 205/45. Same issue with the 195/50/16 winter sadness wheels currently on there.

I dont hear it so much as feel it. But there is a sound. And it is brief. Starts in mid-turn, lasts about 1/2 second, and is gone before I let off the brakes or finish the turn, but after the g-force is starting to subside. My rub theory has some lateral tire-deformation dynamic in it, but I dont want to go too far out on a limb with stuff like this.

I dont have any 15" wheels to test, to eliminate rubbing the fender theories, and that's my first guess, but has anyone else felt the rub through the brake pedal? And I could swear the pedal gets a bit softer in that brief moment too. Like if someone quickly opened the bleeder just for a tiny moment. Its subtle, but noticeable.

Thanks in advance for advice/anecdotes.

This topic was modified 1 week ago 2 times by NottaMiata

🐸, 2003, Electric Green Mica, not enough mods

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Posted : November 20, 2020 2:18 pm
dev
 dev
(@dev)
Just a member. Moderator

The first thing to check is to remove the wheel for inspection.  Thats all you can do, brain storming is just that not very helpful until it is dealt with. I would remove the caliper and inspect both pads for any cracks or misalignments. 

 I had something similar and it was a TRD front pad that cracked which caused it to misalign on the slider and it made the pedal feel weird.  Those pads sucked but thats it a different topic.  

 

 

 

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Posted : November 20, 2020 2:29 pm
NottaMiata
(@nottamiata)
Honorable Member

@dev,

Thanks. The odd thing is that it only occurs at that one turn and when I am in bat-outta-hell-lite mode. I think there is quite a bit of force happening there since it is a fast turn, going down a hill, and really seems to be coming from the front, outboard wheel. Doesn't mean I am just assuming it is fender rub (although i can imagine that a lot of tire is being pushed up under the car at that moment, maybe enough to make it rub when it usually does not). I do know that it runs awfully close to rubbing all the time. Its like the car was designed for smaller wheels or something...

I am not arguing, of course. Same increased forces could be irritating a failing brake component. Gonna try to find some chalk, although I don't want to go to ANY stores nowadays.

I am overdue for new pads and rotors, starting to feel some warp in the rotors. Already own all the parts, just can't muster the motivation or the courage to do a brake job with no experience and no supervision. Looks easy *on paper*, but...

This post was modified 1 week ago by NottaMiata

🐸, 2003, Electric Green Mica, not enough mods

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Posted : November 20, 2020 2:56 pm
dev
 dev
(@dev)
Just a member. Moderator

If you are overdue for pads and rotors I would just get that done now and have the mechanic inspect the brakes.  

 I wouldn't do  brake work if you have never done it before especially if you don't having someone experienced watching your work.  Its not that bad but I would never do something I learned on the internet unless I was mechanically inclined and you just need a youtube video to give you a synopsis of what is involved. I have seen people mess up all kinds of stuff with watching Youtube videos and end up striping bolts or trusting that the youtube presenter knows what they are doing as there is plenty of idiots showing other idiots how to mess up their car with the comments calling them idiots written by idiots.  

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Posted : November 20, 2020 3:28 pm
NottaMiata
(@nottamiata)
Honorable Member

@dev,

Yeah, thats about what I was thinking. Bums me out a bit, tho, since I miss an opportunity to learn the procedure, not to mention the dent to my wallet (which I am fully aware could be much worse if I make a different decision).

On paying closer atrention to it today, I am pretty sure it is not rubbing. I just don't think I have the wheel turned far enough in that turn to get a rub.  It is two distinct, quick vibrations in the brake pedal, with a grindy sort of undertone to them.

Would like to know why this only happens at that one spot, even considering there might be a part failure. I make mildly spirited right turns elsewhere and it does not happen anywhere else. Seems like the downslope is the only difference.

 

🐸, 2003, Electric Green Mica, not enough mods

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Posted : November 23, 2020 1:16 pm
ISpy
 ISpy
(@ispy)
Estimable Member

I believe that brake jobs are super simple - at least on the fronts.  Because of the brake cable in the rear and how difficult it is with putting pads in with so limited space, that job can be easily frustrating.  If you have decent mechanical skills, replacing the rotors, pads, cleaning the new rotors, cleaning the carrier; compressing and cleaning the caliper; cleaning and greasing the slides - is 15 minutes a side tops.  Understanding the parts, how they operate, how to inspect, clean and grease are all things you can pick up reading and watching videos.  The trial and error is less that a mistake will result in a near death experience.  The issue is if you can't put it back together and are stuck in your driveway unable to complete the job. The parts go together one way and that is pretty easy to tell since the old ones show tell-tale signs of seating. I believe that if you understand the parts and process, then take it on. Bleeding the brakes, is also very simple, but more of a risk with screwing it up.  So I would not take that on without supervision (and you need a helper or a bleeder).  I bear no responsibility for your decisions. 

Get: stiff steel bristle brush; make sure you have brake grease for the slides (included in most pad kits); a large pair of pump pliers or brake compression kit; a can of brake clean; a rag; and, small aluminum bake pan (to catch the brake clean).

If you could put in your will that I have first dibs at the wrecked frog, much appreciated.

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Posted : November 26, 2020 12:48 pm
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