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Vegitable Seeds For Trade or Sale?

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Uncle Mush
(@uncle-mush)
Member Moderator

I wasn't quite sure where to put this thread because it has nothing to do with MR2s but it does have to do with private sales. 

I usually have a bit of a garden growing and will do so this year, hopefully as usual.  The problem is, there is a much higher demand for vegetable seeds this year than usual (gee, I wonder why?) and seeds are a bit more scares this year.  That said, I am looking for seeds to grow Zucchini, English Cucumber, and maybe some tomatoes, watermelon and cantaloupe (or any other kind of melon, for that matter).  Anybody got some vegetable seeds from your garden that you would be willing to sell or trade with me? 

The only thing I have to offer is Black-Eyed Peas -- yes the vegetable seeds, not the rock group. 

I've already planted and am growing Black-Eyed Peas for this year and have seeds left over from last year's crop.  Soooo . . . if anyone's got some veggie seeds they would like to sell or trade with me, let me know.

Thanks.

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Topic starter Posted : April 4, 2020 4:26 pm
Patrick Lipp and dev liked
Patrick Lipp
(@pattielipp)
Guy with car Admin

I have this obsession with Hot peppers and have been gathering seeds there, so I have TONS of Thai pepper and habanero seeds. I also have lots of sweet bell pepper seeds. Otherwise, I think I may have a couple hundred tomato seeds of various sorts. I'll have to pull them out and see.

www.patricklipp.com
www.mytechliving.com

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Posted : April 7, 2020 8:19 am
dev and Uncle Mush liked
dev
 dev
(@dev)
Just a member. Moderator
Posted by: @pattielipp

I have this obsession with Hot peppers and have been gathering seeds there, so I have TONS of Thai pepper and habanero seeds. I also have lots of sweet bell pepper seeds. Otherwise, I think I may have a couple hundred tomato seeds of various sorts. I'll have to pull them out and see.

 I tried to grow Carolina Reaper but it didn't work out. Im not the biggest fan of hot sauces but they do sell a season shaker version of crushed reaper which I put on my Pizzas and its just wow. I may try again this year to grow it.  

 

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Posted : April 7, 2020 9:18 am
Uncle Mush
(@uncle-mush)
Member Moderator

My son loves hot peppers.  I bought some locally made ghost chili sauce for him and though he would only use it sparingly,  he would have no visible reaction to the heat.  I watched as another family member ingested some on a corn chip,  same amount as my son, fall to his knees coughing, eyes watering and then ran to the bathroom to vomit.  Not my cup of tea.  I can barely eat a handful of jalapeño-cheader Cheetoes (spelling?) before my mouth is on fire.

What is the secret to growing great tomatoes?  The last two years I've gown big plants with few/small fruits -- even the beefsteak tomatoes never got that big.  

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Topic starter Posted : April 7, 2020 9:42 am
dev
 dev
(@dev)
Just a member. Moderator

 I think you will get a kick out of this. I showed it to my Nieces and they started crying. 

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Posted : April 7, 2020 9:49 am
Uncle Mush
(@uncle-mush)
Member Moderator

Oh my goodness!  I started out laughing and then the more I watched it the more I became anxious.  Holy crap, batman!  

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Topic starter Posted : April 7, 2020 10:58 am
dev
 dev
(@dev)
Just a member. Moderator

The guy I met who makes those oven pizzas through a friend invited us to Skyline drive VA where is whole family was meeting. 

 I turned him on a week back with the Caroline Reaper seasoning  and he brought it with him. We were drinking scotch and waiting for the pizzas to come out and then decided to spice it up. It was the biggest ice breaker as his whole family were freaking out and surprisingly they came back for more pain. It was the best ice breaker I have ever experienced meeting new people. 

 I have tried many of the other popular papers like ghost, scorpion and so on but there is something special about the Carolina reaper. It has a flavor thats makes food taste better and although its very hot you don't need to add too much of it to enjoy it without burning your self down.  When they add it to hot sauce its not the same thing, get the seasoning. 

 

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Posted : April 7, 2020 11:19 am
Uncle Mush
(@uncle-mush)
Member Moderator

I will not heed the admonition from Blue Oyster Cult.  I will fear the (Carolina) reaper.  Musical pun intended <grin>.

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Topic starter Posted : April 7, 2020 11:27 am
dev liked
CSPIDY
(@cspidy)
Estimable Member

Back in the 70s a friend of mine once was thrown in jail for 18 seeds an Alabama state trooper found in his ashtray.

he was driving a black Chevy van and was from Minnesota. Peace sign Mag wheels and a 4 on the floor

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Posted : April 7, 2020 8:27 pm
neomr2 liked
nocoolname
(@nocoolname)
Estimable Member
Posted by: @uncle-mush

What is the secret to growing great tomatoes?  The last two years I've gown big plants with few/small fruits -- even the beefsteak tomatoes never got that big.  

Proper soil, fertilize, and the correct amount of water.  My family grows produce (peppers, cucumbers, tomatoes, sweet corn and strawberries) commercially. For a home garden it's pretty much the same with the addition of not blocking sunlight for most produce.  Don't plant near a boarded fence/trees/house or anything that blocks sunlight.  The more light, the better things will grow.  It also won't hurt to do a soil test.   Our local Co-Op office sends our samples off for us.  This is the growing stuff equivalent of an oil analysis.  It'll tell you what nutrients you have and don't have in your soil.  Since this is a home garden, cover cropping doesn't really apply, but picking out the proper fertilizer to put the right amount of nutrients in and possibly spreading a little lime to correct the pH level.  Getting the ground right is a very important step.  Also with watering, do so at opportune time, early morning, late evening, or when it's very overcast.  That way the water will soak in to the ground and get absorbed by the roots instead of evaporating.  Concentrate on wetting the soil, not the plant leaves.  If you can, drip lines along the ground after the plants are big enough to provide shade will be the best, and you can fertilize while watering if needed by making a siphon tank.  We lay plastic with a drip line under it, then plant the produce through the plastic, so all the watering and fertilizing done after planting goes directly on the soil and is absorbed by the roots. 

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Posted : April 9, 2020 12:25 am
marsrock7 liked
Uncle Mush
(@uncle-mush)
Member Moderator

Thanks.   I know its pretty stupid on my part, but I  haven't fertilized that raised planter yet, but I will now.  Everything else in that bed grew pretty well, but what you wrote makes a lot of sense. 

 

I've got everything on drip.  I haven't tried putting plastic down after planting. 

 

By the way, my son-in-law was able to get a couple zucchini plants, a yellow squash, 1 tomato plant and 2 cucumber plants, so perhaps this weekend I can get those planted and established. 

 

Thanks again for your expertise.   

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Topic starter Posted : April 9, 2020 1:01 am
nocoolname
(@nocoolname)
Estimable Member

No Problem UM.  We have a piece of equipment that pulls up dirt to create a bed while laying the plastic, with the raised bed, it keeps water from pooling on the plastic after rain, helps keep the water from evaporating after watering and keeps weeds down.  I'm not sure how well it would work for a home garden, works well for 140+ acres of produce though. 

 

Here's an old pic of planting in the plastic, on the left is pepper plants just planted.

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Depending on if you do any canning and/or freezing a couple zucchini plants will be plenty.  I love some fresh zucchini, yellow squash, broccoli, and carrots steamed with a little seasoning on top. Or use the zucchini, some bell pepper slices and onion slice with some beef on skewers thrown on the grill.

Completely forgot, I've used Gurneys and Victory for seeds in the past if doing a small amount of something.

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Posted : April 9, 2020 3:52 am
Uncle Mush and dev liked
dev
 dev
(@dev)
Just a member. Moderator

All this talk of Carolina reaper made me order some. If anyone is interested this is the good stuff.  It makes pizzas taste amazing. 

 

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00U5G7IN6/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o00_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00U5G7IN6/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o00_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

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Posted : April 12, 2020 8:05 am
T-bone
(@t-bone)
Prominent Member

I’m an avid gardener we do about 40 tomato plants, 10 or pepper varieties, squash of all kinds most years.  Squash are the only ones we do from sends which we keep each year.  We get our seedlings from a local place called Indy urban gardens. They grow food to feed the poor and are non- profit.  As a 503c all purchases are even tax deductible so it’s a feel good all around. We can a bunch in the fall relishes and such was just planning when to our some extra garden soil to top off the boxes along with our compost. We plant here early may but have an army of blankets for tee-pees in case we get a late freeze

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Posted : April 12, 2020 8:40 am
pwnzor
(@pwnzor)
Reputable Member

Teenage girls in bikini tops... they could have been reading from the Congressional Record of 1787 and people would watch it.  The fact that they were trying to choke down some Carolina Reapers just made it funny.  

 

We just started a salsa garden.  So... we'll see in about 75-85 days if I can go outside and pick fresh things to make salsa with.

http://zero3nine.com/files/dospwn.gif

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Posted : April 14, 2020 9:50 pm
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