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mrsponz
(@mrsponz)
Estimable Member

Because of this darn virus, I have found myself riding my cross-bike a lot more than I ever used to. Custom built it about 22 years ago. I bought the frame and all the components and assembled it myself. 22 years ago it felt great, these days it feels too big. Did I shrink? Anyhow, I learned/relearned something this week. Bicycle tires do get old. Thread looks good and a quick look at the sidewalls saw no potential problems. Wrong - two flat tires in three days. Had to twice walk my bike over two miles back home. Tires / tubes around 8-10 years old. They were great for about 7 months until this week. On top of it, I had to replace the tires / tubes myself. LBS said about a week. AAARGH. Spent all weekend finding the right parts and doing it myself. Boy, what a pain. I had to keep looking for tips and tricks on the internet to figure out how to do it. After 22 years I had forgotten!! I actually feel good that I accomplished this without have to wait a week and pay someone.

So replace your bike tires every 5-7 years whether they look good or not. Kinda like our Spyders !! 😀 

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Posted : October 12, 2020 10:51 pm
T-bone and dev liked
T-bone
(@t-bone)
Honorable Member

Indeed changed a flat a Sunday new tire but the tube was old it gave up. Ride with a spare need to hit the shop for a new one.  I have been riding a lot this year and happy to be back into it. My ride is a 1987 Cannondale with a mix of 105 and ultegra of the day.

BD2A7991 95F3 4E1A AA3B DD05A6F9DE4D
9893B585 5082 40D1 80F1 535857B64741
CCA3A7E4 5F60 4070 9084 0283E4D29CE7

 

edit: take a look at my saddle. That bag has a surprising amount of room. I carry a new tube, tire spoons, several Allen wrenches for various adjustments on the mech, a patch kit (for flat #2), a multi tool and an extra garage door remote.  Carry ID and phone in my shirt pockets (deep and on the back of your typical cycling shirt) highly recommend both for riding. Bike chamois shorts are also very good for absorbing long miles on the bike. 

This post was modified 3 weeks ago by T-bone
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Posted : October 13, 2020 6:50 am
ISpy
 ISpy
(@ispy)
Estimable Member

I would keep a stock of training tires in a box along with extra tubes, chains, cables and handlebar wrap. Typically buying 6 tires and about 3 tubes at a time just to keep a stock. I have recently discovered even new, unused tires will delaminate under pressure after about 4 years. I think a similar issue might be relevant to automotive tires, especially high speed sport tires.

Regarding the cyclocross (CX) bike, MRSPONZ, the bike is too big because your taste has changed or like everyone else you are getting shorter less flexible?  Would getting a shorter angled stem, shorter crank arms, and event a (gasp) angled seat post help?

T-Bone, those photos speak several thousand words.

Although becoming dated...I ride: 56cm S-Works; 55 Serotta Ti CX; Cannondale tandem; Matsuri fixed gear; and, a 26" Yeti ProFRO.

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Posted : October 13, 2020 1:27 pm
T-bone liked
mrsponz
(@mrsponz)
Estimable Member

The seat to pedal distance is perfect. The shoulder to handlebar reach is perfect. I am pretty sure I am suffering from "old man syndrome" 😀 I can ride the bike, I just cannot get on/off comfortably.

I'm having a hard time lifting my right leg over the "darn dam" rear wheel. That, and I hate doing the "tippy toe" from my seat while I am waiting at a red light. I might  just end up just getting a "step through" beach cruiser. What's wrong with planting your feet on the ground? (I know, I know - don't answer that).

BTW -- the new tires and tubes are working great, who knew ??

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Posted : October 13, 2020 8:52 pm
T-bone
(@t-bone)
Honorable Member
Posted by: @mrsponz

The seat to pedal distance is perfect. The shoulder to handlebar reach is perfect. I am pretty sure I am suffering from "old man syndrome" 😀 I can ride the bike, I just cannot get on/off comfortably.

I'm having a hard time lifting my right leg over the "darn dam" rear wheel. That, and I hate doing the "tippy toe" from my seat while I am waiting at a red light. I might  just end up just getting a "step through" beach cruiser. What's wrong with planting your feet on the ground? (I know, I know - don't answer that).

BTW -- the new tires and tubes are working great, who knew ??

sounds like your frame might be large for you. I am 5'10" and am riding a 58cm frame. at a light, i can stand flat footed over my top tube. I leave a foot clipped in and plant my free foot directly on the pavement. The key is not trying to stay on the saddle while waiting. So true new tires and tubes make a huge difference. One simply because of tread and lack of rubber degradation but equally important is the huge increase in technology for tread and materials. I ride 700C 23's as the bike was designed for that in 1987. current tires are 28's in width roll better and will less resistance than my 23s with better grip and durability. my dropouts are only 126mm so I am limited on what I can upgrade regarding wheels but I am going to be looking into it for this winter.  

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Posted : October 14, 2020 1:33 pm
ISpy
 ISpy
(@ispy)
Estimable Member

When I started bicycle racing in 1991, the Cyrille Guimard formula was 0.65 times the measurement of your inseam for the frame size and 0.883 times your inseam for total distance from saddle cupping to center of the bottom bracket. That 0.883 number was calculated using the standard 170mm crank arm length. So inseam cm (0.883) + 170mm is from saddle cupping to top of pedal. Until the late 90s the frame top tube lengths were proportional to the seat tube for road bikes. Over time, frame materials and seat post materials allowed for pretty dramatic changes in seat tube to top tube ratios. Blah blah blah, there is an interesting biomechanical science to it.  Simply for reference, your upper body extension should not require your hands to support much weight.  

At 5'11" the largest road frame I rode was a 57cm seat tube with 175mm cranks and 57cm top tube with 120mm stem. Loss of that fitness and probably a drop to 5'10, I now ride a 56cm seat tube 172.5mm crank with a 56.5cm top tube and 110mm stem. I also now use only unleaded gas.

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Posted : October 15, 2020 12:58 pm
cyclehead and T-bone liked
mrsponz
(@mrsponz)
Estimable Member

Well T-bone, in your honor, I dug out of my garage my old Viscount Aerospace Pro (1978). I'm gonna throw out to you guys some names you might not recognize: Suntour Cyclone GT front/rear derailleurs, Mavic Module E rims using Weyless F/R hubs and (at the time) Specialized Touring Turbo (27x1 / 25-630) tires, Suntour Winner 13-32 freewheel with a TA Cyclotourist 34-52 front. At that time I truly believed "there was no mountain I could not climb." It was around 21lbs and very twitchy (but not in a scary way). I felt I controlled the bike and it not me. The infamous aluminum "death fork" was replaced long ago. I used to ride down to Carlsbad (near San Diego) and back, around 100 miles round trip to visit friends on the weekend. Well yesterday, I rode it again after about 10 years. Ouch. I forgot what it was like to be hunched over all the time and having to reach for the brakes. I would need to ride it a little bit every day to get used to it again - but it might be fun. Can't believe I actually went bike/camping on it all the way to Cabo San Lucas. I don't even drive there anymore. 

Ok. enough nostalgia, I'm going for a bike ride to get a beer and a taco  😀 

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Posted : October 16, 2020 4:28 pm
T-bone liked
neomr2
(@neomr2)
Reputable Member

I was an early BMX and mountain bike rider and used to get most of my stuff from Bike Nashbar which was one of the few places to get high end parts back in the early 80's...

When I did a quick search, I was very surprised to see they are still in existence -> https://www.nashbar.com/ .

I never enjoyed the road thing, but times have changed and the roadies have way more protections now than they did back when I was riding...  😎 

Mono Craft GT-300 with a few upgrades...

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Posted : October 17, 2020 8:49 am
T-bone liked
T-bone
(@t-bone)
Honorable Member
Posted by: @mrsponz

Well T-bone, in your honor, I dug out of my garage my old Viscount Aerospace Pro (1978). I'm gonna throw out to you guys some names you might not recognize: Suntour Cyclone GT front/rear derailleurs, Mavic Module E rims using Weyless F/R hubs and (at the time) Specialized Touring Turbo (27x1 / 25-630) tires, Suntour Winner 13-32 freewheel with a TA Cyclotourist 34-52 front. At that time I truly believed "there was no mountain I could not climb." It was around 21lbs and very twitchy (but not in a scary way). I felt I controlled the bike and it not me. The infamous aluminum "death fork" was replaced long ago. I used to ride down to Carlsbad (near San Diego) and back, around 100 miles round trip to visit friends on the weekend. Well yesterday, I rode it again after about 10 years. Ouch. I forgot what it was like to be hunched over all the time and having to reach for the brakes. I would need to ride it a little bit every day to get used to it again - but it might be fun. Can't believe I actually went bike/camping on it all the way to Cabo San Lucas. I don't even drive there anymore. 

Ok. enough nostalgia, I'm going for a bike ride to get a beer and a taco  😀 

Awesome! My sr400 was Originally spec’ed with suntour. Previous owner upgraded to shimano 105 & ultegra. My older bike was suntour (friction shifting) and I  loved it.

 

if the components are in good shape they will still treat you well. My delemia is I love my old bike very much but I am limited in what I can do to update. I could use and would love updated wheels but with a 126mm rear dropout it will not fit a modern hub and even if I can find a vintage new hub (I can) I still may be stuck with 700X23’s due to the clearance issues. I might be able to squeeze in 25s for about 500 bucks for a set.  I have been considering 3 bikes. A cannondale SuperSix likely with 105 due to price (want to keep below 4K), an Orbea M20 or M30 team (ultegra vs their aero frame with 105) and from a recent trip to my LBS for tubes to replace my spare from my recent flat a Giant TCR advance Pro with ultegra. I love my current cannondale so that gets the vote for brand loyalty but you get less for your dollar here. The Orbea is the most beautiful and unique there is a dealer about an hour away. The Giant is the Brad at the LBS solid bike, an excellent, bike but it’s the Toyota  of bikes. All give me better wheels, access to adding a direct force power meter that is not pedal, sti shifting ( never had that) and an 11 or 12 gear cassette (my current is 6) I’m on a 52/42 up front and there are better options for my old legs these days. 

still not riding enough outside to justify given winter is setting in and my usual jaunt (a 30 mile round trip work commute) gives me a whopping 500 ft or so of elevation change which I could easily do on a fixie. I need to grab a social life and find a group of riding friends to get my outside miles up to 3k or so a season or get my wife an e bike so she will join me 🙂

This post was modified 2 weeks ago by T-bone
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Posted : October 18, 2020 8:03 am
mrsponz
(@mrsponz)
Estimable Member

Obviously, for a price, you can have the rear end spaced out to 130. Not sure if it is worth it if you can only run 25-28 tires. But maybe that is all you want. Did you ever try 32's on your current frameset. I have seen 700c wheels going for less than $500, unless you want higher quality. Have you looked at Velomine?

I was considering converting my old Viscount from 27" to 700C but was having issues with both tire clearance and brake reach. I might just leave it alone.

I have three bikes. My Viscount, my cross bike and my Bob Jackson Super Tourist. Each one has it own's purpose. The Bob Jackson was loaned to a friend - am still waiting for HER to return it !!

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Posted : October 19, 2020 9:26 pm
T-bone
(@t-bone)
Honorable Member
Posted by: @mrsponz

Obviously, for a price, you can have the rear end spaced out to 130. Not sure if it is worth it if you can only run 25-28 tires. But maybe that is all you want. Did you ever try 32's on your current frameset. I have seen 700c wheels going for less than $500, unless you want higher quality. Have you looked at Velomine?

I was considering converting my old Viscount from 27" to 700C but was having issues with both tire clearance and brake reach. I might just leave it alone.

I have three bikes. My Viscount, my cross bike and my Bob Jackson Super Tourist. Each one has it own's purpose. The Bob Jackson was loaned to a friend - am still waiting for HER to return it !!

I am actually looking for some new old stock (NOS) online to see if I can get a deal. I also found out that a 130 will actually squeeze into the 126 so that is a plus. as for tires the trade off is clearance where road debris gets tossed into the mech I might be able to fit say a 28 but would it gum me up after every ride. the money I put in so far (pedals (SPDs) saddle, bar, stem, brake levers) have elevated comfort and performance a lot. adding a power meter would be easy if I was not so dammed set on keeping the SPDs as I love the easy use (pedals are light and do not rotate so engagement is simple and cleat receivers on both sides of the pedal) and the shoes are a dream to walk in (Giro Aegis). current available vetted power meter pedals are all LOOK or Shimano SPD-SLs 🙁

crank and hub types don't do well on vintage frame sets. There is an indirect power meter that mounts on the bars along with my Garmin but 500+ for new wheels and 300 for the power meter is just under 1/2 the cost of what I would want which to me is the same given the frame could go at any time (not that I think that is likely but Al does exhibit cumulative fatigue)

was going to ride to work today but it is cold and this morning I did over under's on my peloton. FTP is 252 and which puts me at about 3.2 watts/KG getting ready for another test but rides like this one make my brain say WTF are you doing to yourself you crazy bastard 🙂

Screen Shot 2020 10 20 at 9.27.35 AM

 

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Posted : October 20, 2020 9:48 am
T-bone
(@t-bone)
Honorable Member

BOO! 

Halloween Kit and fantastic Fall weather makes for a fun but treacherous ride in the wet leaves 

Photo on 10 22 20 at 10.44 AM
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Posted : October 22, 2020 11:00 am
T-bone
(@t-bone)
Honorable Member

I had a second flat rear tire again this time miles from home requiring a field repair. The back to back rides with flat had me wondering  if my back wheel is at fault. The good news is that the 35 year old zeffal frame pump still gets the job done 

miles for the day 

2900DA18 C0A2 4037 A1E1 51B966F2FDCE
This post was modified 1 week ago by T-bone
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Posted : October 22, 2020 8:53 pm
mrsponz
(@mrsponz)
Estimable Member

And people still like riding tubulars. Must be the glue their sniffing. 😀 

Did you check the tires for anything strange. They can look good on the outside but have an internal problem. Rare, but it happens. Glad you made it home ok. 

Zefal pumps are awesome. Mine was until I accidently bent it. 

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Posted : October 22, 2020 9:42 pm
T-bone
(@t-bone)
Honorable Member
Posted by: @mrsponz

And people still like riding tubulars. Must be the glue their sniffing. 😀 

Did you check the tires for anything strange. They can look good on the outside but have an internal problem. Rare, but it happens. Glad you made it home ok. 

Zefal pumps are awesome. Mine was until I accidently bent it. 

I have not seen a rider with sew ups in a long time. They are very hard to change on the road without a support car following you 🙂 I did inspect the tire outside by eye and inside by running my fingers along the inside. Pretty sure my wheels were retaped at my last overhaul. I might bring the wheel in and have the gang take a look also needs to be retrued based on this years miles.  

one thing about the potential upgrade that come in is tubeless. Like a car tire the wheel and tube along with an inside  sealant , are supposed to be more durable but like sew ups are harder to change on the road. My concern is how they hold up over a winter in a garage and how hard they are to repair on the road ( will I need to Cary tire slime now.

 

the real reason sew ups are disappearing even in the pros is that clincher tire tec has approached the rolling resistance advantages of sew ups maintaining their superior durability 

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Posted : October 23, 2020 6:59 am
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